This Is Your Brain On Words (Quotes To Inspire Creativity)

This might seem like a bit of surprise, but I have not always enjoyed the writing process.

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And I don’t think I’m alone in this attitude. Much like any “seemingly” basic skill, writing takes some time to learn, and a lifetime to master. Because of that hard truth about writing, from a young age I always felt pressured into the writing process and moreover, that I didn’t have the characteristics to make my ideas and literary voice heard. So I did what I would do with social situations, I would borrow ideas and quotes from other established works.

This of course changed after I got accepted into university and had the opportunity to expand my library of literary options.

It got more difficult!

I thought that maybe I wasn’t mature yet or life experiences hadn’t happened enough for me so I didn’t have a way of articulating detailed stories proper. But as I explored my own identity I began to realize that creativity doesn’t happen in a vacuum, and for me, I enjoyed pulling from different sources to build an idea out. Also hard won personal experiences with writing under pressure over and over again helped relieve some of the stress.

Which is a pretty cool thing, if you were to ask me. But I guess you are asking me, seeing as how you are at timotheories right now, reading about my ideas. Fortunately I do have a formal education in the arts so it’s not like I’m Joe Blow from Timbuktu writing about my snail collection.

I’m an expert in the arts and on this journey with you.

Which is why I decided that today I want to share some word wisdom with you, and in anticipation of a little old project I am about to undertake(read: new project. But I’m getting ahead of myself. I’ll share that project with you on a later date. For now, let’s start with that sweet sweet wisdom dear readers.

I’ve written about the power of reading at least once before, but have I discussed the power of words themselves? No I didn’t think so either. Sometimes we get so caught up in our routines (which are helpful) that we forget to spend time enjoying life and *gasp*, procrastinating simply to be immersed in culture.

Matt-LeBlanc-Gasp

But seriously… Sound familiar? Bueller? Bueller? Bueller?

Personally I’ve found that reading exercises my brain and that taking quotes from literature can help cement new ideas or creative directions I want to take – So today I’m going to share with you, in no particular order, some of my favourite quotes from film and literature, as infographics. And after you’ve gone through the list, I want you to think about how you feel. But for now, let’s take a scroll.

 

 

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Bet you are feeling pretty good right now? And some of those quotations are tied into your own experiences. You see, dear readers, I have this theory that word association has the incredible power to motivate, but only to motivate. It doesn’t provide discipline, like at all. But that is not what it was meant for.

You need to balance short term pains (emotions) against long term gains (skill). It’s just how it is. So why not spend some time building a Pinterest board or vision board or whatever to give yourself some instant emotional gratification? And most of those quotes are useful advice anyway, and there have been studies done that indicate human beings can only learn a few new things at a time.

So put your ideas up somewhere digital or real; bathroom and bedroom walls can do the trick. And revisit those quotes regularly, that way you can slowly absorb the knowledge you need, to increase your knowledge, skill, and discipline to create.

While, I’m out of theories and wisdom for the day friends, so I’ll see you tomorrow with something timely!

Tim!

Where The Art Is (The Google Cultural Institute)

You ever watch those movie trailers, posters or commericials which start off by saying “since the dawn of time…”? I find them cheesy too, dear readers. But I want to try it out one time okay?

Since the dawn of time, mankind has created artwork and stored it in precious places. In other words, for what seems like forever.

What’s forever, precious?

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You know, FOR-EV-ER? Eternity? Infinity? Time without end? Even you can comprehend THAT Gollum.

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You don’t believe me, well that’s fine. I love pulling out my art history cap every now and again. Just give me a minute here to get down to business and find some images and links to get this party started.

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This image was one of the first cave painting images I ever saw when I was doing my undergrad, at the time it was considered to be one of the oldest images ever made (approx. 32,000BC – 30,000BC).

According to this article, a new theory has cropped up. Humans having been making art for about 42,000 years, which when taken along with the theory of evolution, means that humans have been making art for even longer than we’ve been thinking about things. Which is amazing to me, because I’ve always considered art to be a language in and of itself.

That means that we need art more then we need literature and speech, it’s something that we all can understand and relate to, no matter what the oral or sign language we subscribe to. And it’s foundational to who we are. That’s right, sign language is not universal to all creeds and ethnicities.

So visual language is something we can all experience and relate to, and one which is not interpreted differently in other communication styles. It’s fascinating, really.

Also, while I haven’t read this academic paper on comics, linguistics and visual language, just yet – I did find an interesting point made pretty much at the start of the paper which helps with my argument.

Many authors of comics have metaphorically compared their writing process to that of language. Jack “King” Kirby, celebrated as one of the most influential artists of mainstream American comics, once commented, “I’ve been writing all along and I’ve been doing it in pictures” (Kirby, 1999). Similarly, Japan’s “God of Comics” Osamu Tezuka stated, “I don’t consider them pictures …In reality I’m not drawing. I’m writing a story with a unique type of symbol” (Schodt, 1983). Recently, in his introduction to McSweeny’s (Issue 13), modern comic artist Chris Ware stated overtly that, “Comics are not a genre, but a developing language.” Furthermore, several comic authors writing about their medium have described the properties of comics like a language. Will Eisner (1985) compared gestures and graphic symbols to a visual vocabulary, a sentiment echoed by Scott McCloud (1993), who also described the properties governing the sequence of panels as its “grammar.” Meanwhile, Mort Walker (1980), the artist of Beetle Bailey, has catalogued the graphic emblems and symbols used in comics in his facetious dictionary, The Lexicon of Comicana.

You see, we need visual art just as much as we need other languages and the fact that so many people discard this skill for themselves, their children, their students, and the younger generation is frightening to me.

I’m generalizing here, which I hate to do, but so often I hear stories from people that made art when they were young, and then gave it up. We cannot seem to find value in learning the right skills needed to draw accurately, and attribute it to an ability which only some humans can possess. That is false and limiting behaviour.

But today’s Wisdom Wednesday resource is going to get you back to your roots, so to speak.

Alright, I have a secret to share with you fine folks today. Well, I wish it was a secret, because this is one of those resources anyone with an internet connection has had access to since 2011 and which I cannot believe hasn’t shown up more often in Facebook newsfeeds, on blog posts, and in cultural events.

The Google Cultural Institute is an amazing achievement in digital curation and one which features artwork from around the world, archival exhibitions, and three-dimensional recreations of world heritage sites.

You can navigate this content through Art Project, Historic Moments, and World Wonders, all from your main navigation menu. What I find especially cool is that you can take virtual tours of over 40 different museums, whenever you want.

The search terms are incredible as well – collection, medium, event, place, person, media type, date. And did I mention the Discover feature? It lets you explore related topics at the push of a button. And of course can share your findings with friends too.

But that’s not the best part. As an artist, this gets me the most excited. You can save your favourite items and create your own gallery.

Now tell me that that is not cool. Ha, I don’t believe you! Tell me what you really think! Leave some comments, share some thoughts, and I’ll catch you tomorrow for something timely.

Tim!

 

 

Introduction To Theory

Hello and welcome to my blog! This is my digital platform, soapbox, gallery, lounge, theatre, and studio.

My primary intention with this blog is that I can inspire not only myself to keep making art and putting it out into the world, but to provide a forum for others who care about the arts as well, whether they need a push or maybe some comfort in reading another artists journey. This blog is about finding health and happiness within the arts, and as the tagline at the top of the page suggests, whatever tangent it goes off to at any given point, it will always be digital curating at heart. I say heart, because I am passionate about art, and I don’t think you can have heart without art, now can you, dear reader?

Moving right along… I should introduce myself. My name is Timothy, but most people I know call me Tim. I am an Edmonton Alberta born and raised guy, and for those of you who live here or have lived here, you know that Edmonton has an interesting relationship with the arts.

Just look at this snippet, which is my favourite part of the Wikipedia entry on Edmonton.

Edmonton is a cultural, governmental and educational centre. It hosts a year-round slate of festivals, reflected in the nickname “The Festival City”.[14] It is home to North America’s largest mall, West Edmonton Mall (the world’s largest mall from 1981 until 2004),[15] and Fort Edmonton Park, Canada’s largest living history museum.[16]

We Edmontonians have lots of potential to make cool art because of already existing attractions and because the terrible weather months give us focus whenever the snow dumps down. I kinda timed my first entry with the start of winter to illustrate exactly this point. So we should look at West Edmonton Mall (WEM or The Mall to lots of us) and Fort Edmonton Park for a moment. I grew up within walking distance of The Mall and have been fascinated by the hustle of malls ever since. I attribute a great deal of my interest in pop culture to the weird whims and details of WEM. It is an ever-changing behemoth that features items like an indoor amusement park, an indoor water park, a massive theatre that once hosted a fire breathing dragon, and even a dinner theatre. The other tidbit of that Wikipedia entry I really enjoy is about Fort Edmonton Park, nestled alongside the North Saskatchewan River in the SW quadrant of Edmonton. Fort Edmonton happens to have a very vibrant group of interpreters who all seem to be involved in the Edmonton theatre community in one capacity or another. What is even better about this place is that both of my brothers work here in the summer months and so I’ve learned a lot about the character of that hub.

I am also hoping that the more I write about my local community, the more this blog will turn into an arts lifestyle view (guidebook?) for the creative sojourners out there. And so I believe that I must talk about the arts! But the more you get to know me, the more you will see that while I personally cannot live without art in my life, we all benefit from it in one way or another.

Mind you, I am not just interested in the goings on of Edmonton, I mean I love Edmonton, otherwise I wouldn’t have stayed after I graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Art and Design) from the University of Alberta, but I am also interested in Canadian culture and whatever is going on in the world at large.

Even more so, this blog is not just going to be an academic piece where I write about the goings on at the Art Gallery of Alberta, the Jubilee Auditorium or independent sources like Vue Weekly, though I do love all of those things. No, I am going to get into pop culture too. I am a huge movie buff, love all kinds of music, and game with the best of them (board and video), oh and dancing too. Dance is amazing.

Now I am going to tell you how you can get involved! Please leave comments! I am no stranger to criticism and encourage healthy discussion. I went through 4 years of professional art criticism, so your feedback is appreciated, and encouraged.  What if you want to email me? Please do, you can hit me up at timotheories@outlook.com.

That’s all the theories I have right now.

Tim!